Category Archives: Sensory Bins

How to Train Your Dragon Sensory Bin

LittleMan asked me to put together a fan club for his favorite book series, How to Train Your Dragon.
I designed many games and activities for the club, but I knew it was inevitable that we would have some of our members who would want a more open-ended activity.

How to Train Your Dragon Low Mess Sensory Bin (1)

A sensory bin seemed like a sensible option, since it can entertain children of varying ages. I was concerned that most sensory bins can be a bit messy, and we were renting a library room to host our fan club. So I had to make sure that the sensory bin materials were easily cleaned up and low mess. (more…)

Dinosaur

I can’t speak for every geekling, but I know my own two both went through phases where they wanted to be paleontologists. I can’t blame them, dinosaurs are such a fun topic to learn about with a lot of opportunity for hands-on play.

D is for Dinosaur  (more…)

Simple Wild Kratts Sensory Bin

Its been a while since we’ve posted about our sensory bin play, but with the Wild Kratts theme popping up all this month I thought it was a good excuse to make a Wild Kratts sensory bin.

Wild Kratts Birthday (3)

For this bin I utilized a Create-a-Scene Free Printable which you can download from PBS.org as well as some blue and green party streamers. (more…)

A-Z STEM Saturday, I is for Ichnology

Through out this month of January, I will be participating in a collaborative series with 53 other bloggers organized by Little Bins for Little Hands to bring you the A-Z of STEM subjects. While this A-Z STEM series is happening, we also still have our weekly STEM Saturday linky party! This week we’ll be talking about Ichnology.

Ichnology is the study of traces of organismal behavior, such as burrows and footprints. It combines geology and biology in a way that is technically a branch of paleontology, though it isn’t limited to prehistoric animals. One area of ichnology, paleoichnology, focuses on the study of prehistoric or fossil traces while another branch, neoichnology,  focuses on more recent and modern day traces.

Ichnology (1)

We often teach our children about ichnology without even realizing it. Have you ever built a worm farm with them? Or taught them how to spot animal tracks at the park? If so then you’ve been exposing them to ichnology. (more…)