Tag Archiv: homeschooling

Sight Word Tree

I’ve been working with LittleMan on the Dolch sight word pre-primer list, however I’ve noticed many of the words he had memorized are not on the list. Simply high-frequency words in the books we read and family member’s names.
In an effort to try to keep track of the words he has learned and motivate him to keep practicing, we’ve built this sight word tree.
Sight Word Tree
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Writing Station

For those who are just joining us, today is the 3rd and final day in a mini series of posts about our new permanent homeschool stations. For the first few weeks of the school year I was changing out the available tools on LittleMan’s shelves every week, leaving them bare on the weekends. This was a source of stress for me to come up with new activities for his shelves on top of changing out his box lessons every day, SunnyGirl’s tot trays every week, and their sensory bin(s) every week. To make it worse, LittleMan didn’t really seem to interested in some of the options that were put out for him! After some thinking and some talking with LittleMan I decided to continue with our box system as that is working well for us, but to remove the additional activities for awhile, and instead offer permanent stations for basic skills which we are constantly working on: cutting, reading, and writing.
Cutting, Reading, and Writing Sations from Suzy Homeschooler

Today’s station, writing. (more…)

Reading Station

For those who didn’t read yesterday’s post, for the first few weeks of the school year I was changing out the available tools on LittleMan’s shelves every week, leaving them bare on the weekends. This was a source of stress for me to come up with new activities for his shelves on top of changing out his box lessons every day, SunnyGirl’s tot trays every week, and their sensory bin(s) every week. To make it worse, LittleMan didn’t really seem to interested in some of the options that were put out for him! After some thinking and some talking with LittleMan I decided to continue with our box system as that is working well for us, but to remove the additional activities for awhile, and instead offer permanent stations for basic skills which we are constantly working on: cutting, reading, and writing.
Cutting, Reading, and Writing Sations from Suzy Homeschooler

I will share one station per day for the next 3 days. Today’s station, reading. (more…)

Scissor Practice with a Permanent Cutting Station

For the first few weeks of the school year I was changing out the available tools on LittleMan’s shelves every week, leaving them bare on the weekends. This was a source of stress for me to come up with new activities for his shelves on top of changing out his box lessons every day, SunnyGirl’s tot trays every week, and their sensory bin(s) every week. To make it worse, LittleMan didn’t really seem to interested in some of the options that were put out for him! After some thinking and some talking with LittleMan I decided to continue with our box system as that is working well for us, but to remove the additional activities for awhile, and instead offer permanent stations for basic skills which we are constantly working on: cutting, reading, and writing.
Cutting, Reading, and Writing Sations from Suzy Homeschooler

I will share one station per day for the next 3 days. Today’s station, cutting. (more…)

7 Types of Resources for Homeschooling Families

There are two schools of thought in raising children. There are those who believe, “it takes a village to raise a child.” There are also those who claim that they’ve, “seen the village and don’t want it raising [their] child.”
My beliefs lay somewhere in between. I believe that it does take a village to raise a child AND I believe that it is the parent’s responsibility to choose who they trust to be a part of their child’s village.

So what are the options for a person like me who can’t do it all on my own but doesn’t trust the public school system to do it for me?

1- Friends and family.
Have an aunt whose a world traveler, an uncle whose a math whiz? Tap into that resource. Most people are happy to help educate the next generation if the topic is one they are passionate about.

2- Homeschool Co-ops.
A co-op is a group of homeschooling families who work together to educate their children. I am fortunate enough to live in an area of the country where homeschooling is fairly common compared to other areas. However, even if you live somewhere where homeschooling is a rarity, there are always online co-op organizations. I’ve even seen homeschooling mothers from different continents collaborate to teach their children.

3- Online and/or college classes.
There are online courses available to teach children middle school and up in subjects that you might be shaky in, such as science and industrial technology. Even though they are done over the internet, your child would still have a teacher whom they could email for questions and guidance. Many schools even offer student chat rooms where your child can chat with classmates about the subject matter.
If your child is ready for it, you can also enroll them in a local junior college and start getting some credits under their belt. Many homeschoolers graduate high school with a leg up in college for this very reason.

4- Hire a tutor.
A less expensive and more personalized option might be to hire a local highschool or college student to work with your child once or twice a week.

5- Set up an apprenticeship.
If your child has an interest in trade skill, it might be possible to find a master of that trade who is willing to mentor them. No, a local mechanic can’t provide your child with a degree in this field, but they can talk to them about mechanics as a career choice and work with them on the very basics of car maintenance. The same could be said for shadowing a newspaper editor, farmer, franchise owner, minister, etc..

6- Let them get a job.
If your child has an interest in owning a daycare, let them get a part time job as a babysitter or nanny. If they have an interest in becoming a pastry chief, let them work in a bakery. In theory, there are alot of things that a person might think they want to do, but until they try it for themselves, they’ll never know if its an interest they really want to pursue.
I can’t tell you how many children I’ve known who wanted to be a veterinarian when they grew up because they wanted to pet the doggies and the kitties. It never occurred to them that they’d have to do unpleasant things like surgery and euthanize animals. A few weeks sweeping floors and emptying trash cans in a veterinary office might help them realize that they’d be happier with a career as a pet groomer, dog trainer, or working in a doggie daycare.

7- Consider computer programs and online services.
The other six options listed here are person-based, involving flesh and blood people who can help you and your child navigate the upper years of homeschooling. These interactions with persons [of all ages] who share interests with your children are crucial. However technology has come a long way and there are options for this generation which we’ve not had in the past. These options vary by subject. If your child wants to learn a foreign language then Rosetta Stone is said to be a great program. If your child needs help to be a more confident writer then a service like Grammarly might be able to help. Grammarly is an automatic proof reader which is designed not only to correct grammatical and spelling errors but also to walk the writer through correcting the error, improving writing skills and resulting in a more confident writer. I’ve never personally used Grammarly, however it has been rated #1 in its category on Top Ten Reviews.*

So as you can see, there are a lot of options available to homeschooling families. We don’t have to do it all on our own, we don’t have to be superheros nor know-it-alls. We also don’t have to relinquish our child’s education to the public school system to get them quality help where we might be lacking.
I feel much more confident as a homeschooling mother knowing that there is support out there. The sky is the limit when it comes to my child’s education.

* This post has been sponsored by Grammarly. All opinions are my own.